• The Naive wife; Rachel’s Choice

    On the day of her sister’s marriage introduction, radio show host, Rachel Eden, meets Ejike and Doug; two friends that could not be more different.

    She finds herself instantly attracted to Ejike, but there’s something about Doug and the way he’s determined to win her heart. Neither men are who they appear to be, however, making Rachel’s choice harder. Her producer and friend, Dongjap, also makes his intentions known, but could he be a little too late?Rachel’s Choice is a story of many singles, seeking to know the will of God for their relationships and who need, beyond wisdom, grace to make the right choice for their lives.

    It is the first volume of a three-book fictional series about love and marriage.

  • The Naive wife; Rachel’s Hope

    Rachel’s Hope picks up from Rachel’s Diary, after she is confronted with the truth about her husband…or is it? Rachel’s not sure about a lot of things anymore, but she’s sure of one; God loves her. In that, she has hope. Through the challenges of her marriage, a dream is birthed. Rachel discovers that she is well-positioned to help other women in need and seizes the opportunity with both hands.
    By providence, she meets Isaiah, a widower with a little girl, who loves God and, as she later discovers, loves her too. Rachel finds herself confronted with another choice to make.

    Will she seize this opportunity for a new love, or will the old love of her life win the battle for her heart?

    Rachel’s Hope is the last book in The Naive Wife Trilogy about love, faith, and marriage. It deals with hard truths about our world and our hearts, and it may just give you a whole new perspective on life.

    It is a must-read for singles and married folks alike.

  • The Naive wife; Rachel’s Diary

    Three months after making her choice between Ejike, Doug, and Dongjap, Rachel dusts off her diary… They are expecting a baby, but her marriage is not what she anticipated it would be. But that’s just normal, right? Nothing real faith and fervent prayer can’t handle… But as the years go by, Rachel wonders maybe she’s been looking at things all wrong. Maybe it’s not too late to make a different choice…

    Rachel’s Diary is the second volume of The Naive Wife trilogy on love, marriage, and faith. It is an entertaining and eye-opening read for singles and married folks alike.

  • Truth Is A Flightless Bird

    Theresa—has just arrived Nairobi airport where she will be picked up by her old friend, Duncan, an American pastor for a small evangelical denomination. Duncan cannot know that Nice is fleeing her life choices, and her UN job in Mogadishu. She believes she is too innocent-looking, too nice, for anyone to suspect that she is muling drugs.

    But Nice has not contended with her drug-dealer Somali boyfriend having an associate in the Kenya Police Service. Duncan’s car crashes on the way back from the airport.

    Duncan awakes after the car crash, to find himself captive to the sociopathic policeman, Hinga, and the charmingly amoral Ciru. Nice is gone. Plucked from his expat bubble, Duncan must plunge into the moral complexities of the under-city to get Nice back. But how deep can Duncan go, without destroying his faith, and himself?

  • Afonja; The Fall

    After the suicide of the Alaafin Aole Arogangan, powerful forces begin to pull the oyo empire apart. The fear that Aole’s curse has begun its terrible work sweeps across the land. in the midst of this, Aare Ona Kakanfo Afonja of Ilorin has emerged at the top as the most powerful man in the empire.

    But not for long. From the scheming of the scheming of the Oyo Mesi, a mew Alaafin emerges that will not make the mistakes the Aole made. He sets plans in motion to wrest supremacy in his empire from Afonja and the Oyo Mesi.

    Yet it is not only the Oyo Mesi that scheme. In Ilorin, Alfa Alimi quietly bides his time while client kings of Bariba, Dahomey and Nupe join the fray in this epic tale that brings the story that started in Afonja: The Rise to a bloody close.

  • Ogadinma

    A modern feminist classic in the making from a rising star of the Nigerian literature scene Ogadinma Or ‘Everything Will be All Right’ tells the story of the na&ïve and trusting Ogadinma as she battles against Nigeria’s societal expectations in the 1980s.

    After a rape and unwanted pregnancy leave her exiled from her family in Kano, thwarting her plans to go to university, she is sent to her aunt’s in Lagos and pressured into a marriage with an older man.
    As their whirlwind romance descends into abuse and indignity, Ogadinma is forced to channel her independence and resourcefulness to escape a fate which appears all but inevitable. Ogadinma, the UK debut by Ukamaka Olisakwe, introduces a heroine for whom it is impossible not to root, and announces the author as a gifted chronicler of the patriarchal experience.

  • The Morning After

    The Morning After; A Guide for Media Reporting and Prevention of Suicide in Nigeria is an insightful book on how to handle a major mental health problem hardly discussed in Nigeria—suicide. With chilling statistics and anecdotal references, Olufemi Oluwatayo and Martins Ifijeh reveal that there is an urgent need for sensitivity in the way suicides are reported in Nigeria, and they proffer solutions on how to prevent this silent public health challenge. The Morning After is a major work that should provoke a serious conversation on why many Nigerians are now taking their own lives.

  • The Law is an Ass

    Niran Adedokun’s The Law is an Ass, features nine short stories that seem like fictional manifestations of the concerns in his second book, The Danfo Driver in All of Us. In this collection, Niran continues his jeremiad about Nigeria, with stories about sexual shenanigans (both real and imagined), corruption, poverty and deprivation as well as a heady cocktail of other problems that beset a third world country like Nigeria.

  • Sankofa

    Sankofa is a story for anyone who has ever gone looking for a clear identity or home, and found something more complex in its place. Anna is at a stage of her life when she’s beginning to wonder who she really is. She has separated from her husband, her daughter is all grown up, and her mother—the only parent who raised her—is dead.

    Searching through her mother’s belongings one day, Anna finds clues about the African father she never knew. His student diaries chronicle his involvement in radical politics in 1970s London. Anna discovers that he eventually became the president—some would say dictator—of a small nation in West Africa. And he is still alive…

    When Anna decides to track her father down, a journey begins that is disarmingly moving, funny, and fascinating. Like the metaphorical bird that gives the novel its name, Sankofa expresses the importance of reaching back to knowledge gained in the past and bringing it into the present to address universal questions of race and belonging, the overseas experience for the African diaspora, and the search for a family’s hidden roots.

  • Children of the Quicksands

    Simi is sent to stay with her grandmother in a remote village deep in the forests of Nigeria. Witch-like and tight-lipped about the past, her grandmother hints at a tragic family secret – but won’t tell Simi the truth.
    Simi is desperate to discover it for herself, but it’s only when she’s caught in the red quicksand of a forbidden lake that her adventure truly begins.

    Along with new friends, Jay and Bubu, Simi must bring her family back together and restore peace to the village.

  • The Black Dragon

    In Adoria, a small village, a farmer lives a half existence, nameless and waiting for death when a knock on his door changes his life forever. Salem, the girl with a past just as dark as his own slowly renews his will to live. Through her eyes, he sees the world anew, a land filled with possibility and adventure.

    From the plains of Adoria to the sweeping mountains of the Land of Dragons filled with mythical creatures and dazzling magic, a farmer and a girl embark on an epic journey that proves no matter how far away it seems, destiny always finds a way.

    Recommended for children and young adults.

  • Bamboozled By Jesus

    In BAMBOOZLED BY JESUS, a frank and fresh advice book, Orji takes readers on a journey through twenty life lessons, gleaned from her own experiences and her favorite source of inspiration: the Bible.

    She infuses wit and heart along with practical pointers—such as why being talented is not as sexy as being available, and how fear is similar to food poisoning—with the goal of helping others live the most fulfilling, audacious life possible.

    With bold authenticity and practical relatability, Orji will inspire everyone to catapult themselves out of the mundane and into the magnificent. BAMBOOZLED BY JESUS paints a powerful picture of what it means to say “yes” to your most rewarding life—no matter your beliefs.

  • Welcome To Lagos

    Deep in the Niger Delta, officer Chike Ameobi deserts the army and sets out on the road to Lagos. He is soon joined by a wayward private, a naive militant, a vulnerable young woman and a runaway middle-class wife. The shared goals of this unlikely group: freedom and new life.

    As they strive to find their places in the city, they become embroiled in a political scandal. Ahmed Bakare, editor of the failing Nigerian Journal, is determined to report the truth. Yet government minister Chief Sandayo will do anything to maintain his position.
    Trapped between the two, they are forced to make a life-changing decision.

    Full of shimmering detail, Welcome to Lagos is a stunning portrayal of an extraordinary city, and of seen lives that intersect in a breathless story of courage and survival.

  • A Good Name

    “A Good Name is Eziafakaego and Zinachidi’s immigrant story. The Nigerian couple living in Houston are experiencing a difficult marriage.
    The demure girl Eziafa went back home to marry has changed into a bold, educated woman. Unwilling to accept his wife’s growth, Eziafa is determined to clip her wings.

    Zina, who came to Texas as an eighteen-year-old with big dreams, is disillusioned with her life. Unfazed by family expectations and tradition, Zina is ready to start over with Raven, an ex-Mennonite farm boy, even if there is a huge price to pay.

    The novel’s “ripped from the headlines” slant fictionalizes the stories of female Nigerian nurses living in the United States who were murdered by their much older husbands.

  • In The Company of Men

    Two boys venture from their village to hunt in a nearby forest, where they shoot down bats with glee, and cook their prey over an open fire. Within a month, they are dead, bodies ravaged by an insidious disease that neither the local healer’s potions nor the medical team’s treatments could cure. Compounding the family’s grief, experts warn against touching the sick. But this caution comes too late: the virus spreads rapidly, and the boys’ father is barely able to send his eldest daughter away for a chance at survival.

    In a series of moving snapshots, Véronique Tadjo illustrates the terrible extent of the Ebola epidemic, through the eyes of those affected in myriad ways: the doctor who tirelessly treats patients day after day in a sweltering tent, protected from the virus only by a plastic suit; the student who volunteers to work as a gravedigger while universities are closed, helping the teams overwhelmed by the sheer number of bodies; the grandmother who agrees to take in an orphaned boy cast out of his village for fear of infection. And watching over them all is the ancient and wise Baobab tree, mourning the dire state of the earth yet providing a sense of hope for the future.

  • Radio Sunrise

    Ifiok, a young journalist working for a public radio station in Lagos, Nigeria, aspires to always do the right thing but the odds seem to be stacked against him.

    Government pressures cause the funding to his radio drama to get cut off, his girlfriend leaves him when she discovers he is having an affair with an intern, and kidnappings and militancy are on the rise in the country.
    When Ifiok travels to his hometown to do a documentary on some ex-militants’ apparent redemption, a tragi-comic series of events will make him realise he is unable to swim against the tide.

    Radio Sunrise paints a satirical portrait of post-colonial Nigeria that builds on the legacy of the great African satirist tradition of Ngugi Wa Thiong’o and Ayi Kwei Armah.

  • Devil’s Pawn

    When the Black Cats join their capone to “punish” a fellow student, they have no idea the terror they are about to unleash.

    When Simon, a student at Buscan University, awakens from a dream covered in blood, he has no idea he has become a puppet in the hands of a vengeful spirit.

    When the police are called to investigate heinous murders on a university campus, they have no idea they are up against something more sinister than their eyes can see.

    Different worlds collide in this chilling novel that blurs the lines between justice and revenge.

  • Buried Beneath The Baobab Tree

    Based on interviews with young women who were kidnapped by Boko Haram, this poignant novel by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani tells the timely story of one girl who was taken from her home in Nigeria and her harrowing fight for survival. Includes an afterword by award-winning journalist Viviana Mazza.

    A new pair of shoes, a university degree, a husband—these are the things that a girl dreams of in a Nigerian village. And with a government scholarship right around the corner, everyone can see that these dreams aren’t too far out of reach.

    But the girl’s dreams turn to nightmares when her village is attacked by Boko Haram, a terrorist group, in the middle of the night. Kidnapped, she is taken with other girls and women into the forest where she is forced to follow her captors’ radical beliefs and watch as her best friend slowly accepts everything she’s been told.

    Still, the girl defends her existence. As impossible as escape may seem, her life—her future—is hers to fight for.

  • When the Fog Lifts

    When the Fog Lifts is a racy, yet intimate account of the author’s experience in a toxic marriage. Her overly protective childhood does not prepare her for the realities of life.
    Now caught between an emotionally abusive husband and childhood memories of a very different situation with her parents, Seme gives a brutally frank account of her experiences.

    In her first book, Seme Unuigbe-Eroh invites you on her journey from a life filled with chaos and confusion to a life of freedom and endless possibilities.

    Never shying away from the hard truths about what it takes to grow, Seme is transparent and vulnerable, which is freeing and a breath of fresh air and will inspire you to make the changes needed to find real and lasting freedom.

  • The Orchid Protocol

    DCT agent Patrick Emenalo returns to work on the same day there is a bombing at a popular fast food joint in Lagos. Dark Cell, a terrorist group, claims responsibility and demands the release of Red Baron, arms smuggler and crime boss.

    Patrick, caught in a game whose rules are set by shadowy crime syndicate, The Orchid, must race against time to stop the terrorists before they strike again.

    Fast-paced and seamlessly written, Onyekwena’s debut takes bold steps into the widely uncharted world of organised crime in Lagos.

  • Notes On Grief

    Notes on Grief is an exquisite work of meditation, remembrance, and hope, written in the wake of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s beloved father’s death in the summer of 2020.
    As the COVID-19 pandemic raged around the world and kept Adichie and her family members separated from one another, her father succumbed unexpectedly to complications of kidney failure.

    In this extended essay, which originated in a New Yorker piece, Adichie shares how this loss shook her to her core. She writes about being one of the millions of people grieving this year; about the familial and cultural dimensions of grief and also about the loneliness and anger that are unavoidable in it. With signature precision of language, and glittering, devastating detail on the page—and never without touches of rich, honest humour—Adichie weaves together her own experience of her father’s death with threads of his life story, from his remarkable survival during the Biafran war, through a long career as a statistics professor, into the days of the pandemic in which he had stayed connected with his children and grandchildren over video chat from the family home in Abba, Nigeria.

  • Thunder Protocol

    Thunder Protocol is a mid-career oeuvre of only and impressive poems that examine issues ranging from the personal to the global.

    The diversity of themes in this poetry collection is both refreshing and startling, with language that is sometimes witty and inventive, and other times reflective and simple.

    This collection, which seems like an uncovering of the poet, may be considered a bearer of a collective understanding on the workings of the world.

  • Mechanics of Yenagoa

    Ebinimi, star mechanic of Kalakala Street, is a man with a hapless knack for getting in and out of trouble. Some of his troubles are self-inflicted: like his recurring entanglements in love triangles; and his unauthorised joyriding of a customer’s car which sets off a chain of dire events involving drugs, crooked politicians, and assassins.

    Other troubles are caused by the panorama of characters in his life, like: his sister and her dysfunctional domestic situation; the three other mechanics he employs; and the money-loving preacher who has all but taken over his home.
    The story is fast-paced with surprising twists and a captivating plot – a Dickenesque page-turner.

    This is Ebinimi’s story but it is about a lot more than him. It is an exploration of the dynamics between working-class people as they undertake a colourful tour of Yenagoa, one of Nigeria’s lesser-known cities, while using humour, sex, and music, as coping mechanisms for the everyday struggle.

    It is a modern-classic tale of small lives navigating a big city.

  • What Happened to Janet Uzor

    A year after their best friend, Janet Uzor dies in a drowning incident, Pamela and Ebere are trying to cope and move on in their own unique ways. Pamela buries her emotions, while Ebere has been on a mission to find out what really happened to their friend, an excellent swimmer, whose death seems unfair and unconscionable. When Pamela begins to receive sinister letters threatening her life, she finally has to confront her fears, and with the help of Ebere, on/off boyfriend Eche, good friend Daniel Kalio, she sets out to find out who is after her life.
    But to succeed, they must first unravel the mystery behind Janet’s death before the clock runs out and Pamela finds herself at the mercy of a bloodthirsty killer.

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